AMD Genoa 96-core CPU outperforms Intel Sapphire Rapids 56-core CPU in dual-socket benchmarks

time:2022-12-08 05:33:58 source:scripttoolbox.com author:Camera
AMD Genoa 96-core CPU outperforms Intel Sapphire Rapids 56-core CPU in dual-socket benchmarks

AMD (110,230) beat Intel (69,777) by a landslide in the Cinebench R23 nT test. Twitter's YuuKi_AnS was lucky enough to test the latest and greatest workstation and server processors from AMD and Intel. The tech enthusiast and digital creator put an AMD EPYC Genoa Dual Socket (2P) system and an Intel Xeon Platinum 8480+ Sapphire Rapids Dual Socket (2P) system through the Cinebench R23 rendering benchmark. The result is a clear win for the AMD Genoa engineering sample. However, before proceeding, please be skeptical of the results, as YuuKi_AnS acknowledges that this type of shared data is not guaranteed to be accurate, but is "for informational purposes only". The way Cinebench R23 uses reporting processor cores is a little odd. The rendering benchmark seems to be limited to 125C/256T. This can be seen from the System Information section of the benchmarking application. Meanwhile, Windows Task Manager correctly shows that the AMD 'Genoa' machine under test is a 2P system using a pair of 96C/192T processors working together. Obviously, Cinebench R23 is supposed to report 192C/384T; but it may be limited to readings - 125C/256T. With the above system setup instructions and conditions attached, let's take a closer look at the results through the table. According to test results, AMD 'Genoa' ES 2P system is 38% faster than Intel Sapphire Rapids 2P system. This is because AMD systems have more cores, and Cinebench R23 responds well to core expansion. Cinebench says the AMD system has 14% more cores, though according to Windows it has 71% more cores, and the scores would be better if the benchmark used them. While consumers are excited about the upcoming Zen 4-architecture Ryzen 7000 processors at the end of the month, AMD's EPYC Genoa processors (based on the same microarchitecture) are also making waves. A week ago, YuuKi_AnS posted a photo of the EPYC 9654 ES 96-core CPU. Genoa could be released as early as next month, but we don't know for sure, as AMD didn't announce its non-consumer business plans ahead of time. These powerful EPYC chips are scheduled to launch in the second half of 2022, and we are at this stage now.

(Responsible editor:Small parts)

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